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CNRL employee dismissed ‘without cause’ plans to fight

“He basically said a few short sentences then said I was ‘dismissed without cause effective today’ and said if I had any questions, I could direct them to the HR lady and he disconnected,” said Naomi Smart.

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In the wake of Canadian Natural Resources Ltd. introducing a mandatory vaccine policy, one employee has already been fired for opposing the mandates.

Naomi Smart, a heavy equipment operator with CNRL at the Muskeg River Mine, northwest of Edmonton, said she was informed Tuesday she was being “dismissed without cause” with no warning or notice.

Smart, who has worked in the industry since 2001, said she has never been fired from a job or had anyone raise an issue with her performance or capabilities.

“I was an easy target,” Smart said, saying she has only been with the company for under one year.

When the vaccine mandate was announced company-wide, Smart said many employees who opposed the forced shots banded together and started a couple of groups on Telegram, a secure messaging platform.  

“This one guy who’s been at CNRL for 18-years ended up adding me as an admin on one of those groups,” said Smart.

“Employees were just looking for some support and direction so I started looking around for some legal advice.”

Smart got in touch with Calgary lawyer James Kitchen who is now representing the group of employees pushing back against the mandates.

Kitchen told the Western Standard in an earlier interview, his clients would prefer to negotiate a settlement with the company over the issue, but are prepared to go to court if necessary.

“I ended up organizing a zoom meeting with James (Kitchen) and there were over 100 employees on the call,” said Smart.

“So, I guess my name became synonymous with leading the charge.”

On Tuesday, just days before Smart was to fly back to her CNRL worksite to start her shift rotation, she said she was surprised by a call from the CNRL human resources (HR) department.

“I got this call from someone in HR who told me she was connecting me to Tim Hayward, who I think is my department manager,” Smart said confirming she has only met Hayward once.

“He basically said a few short sentences then said I was ‘dismissed without cause effective today’ and said if I had any questions, I could direct them to the HR lady and he disconnected.”

In Alberta, if an employee is terminated without cause, it means the employer is ending the employment for any reason other than serious workplace misconduct.

The Alberta Employment Standards Code says an employer is able to end employment without reason as long as it is not discriminatory and the employee is provided reasonable notice.

The HR person gave Smart some information over the phone and emailed her the details as well. Smart said they requested she sign a non-disclosure agreement and said she would be receiving what she was owed in pay along with $2,000 in severance or something to that effect.”

“They asked me to sign an NDA and said I wasn’t to discuss the terms of my dismissal,” said Smart who has refused to sign.

“The deadline for employees to have their first vaccine was October 20. I watched six of my friends cave under duress and I watched them struggle with their decision (to get vaccinated),” said an emotional Smart.

“I have literally been talking people off the ledge of suicide weekly. These were happy men.”

Smart is concerned about how this dismissal will impact her reputation.

“I’ve worked in the industry for 20 years. I plan to look for another job but I know this is going to hamper my reputation and label me as a trouble-maker.”

Smart plans to speak with a lawyer and will focus on “making sure my people are represented,” she said in reference to those that are looking to her to lead the charge with their legal action against the forced vaccinations.

“When things settle down, I plan to talk to James (Kitchen) about my situation. They (CNRL) used me to send a message to the other employees — if you speak up, this is what will happen to you,” said Smart.

The Western Standard reached out to CNRL for comment on Smart’s dismissal but did not hear back in time for publication. They have refused Western Standard requests for comments for more than a week.

Melanie Risdon is a reporter with the Western Standard
mrisdon@westernstandardonline.com

Melanie Risdon is a Calgary-based Reporter for the Western Standard. She has over 20 years experience in media at Global News, Rogers and Corus. mrisdon@westernstandardonline.com

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5 Comments

5 Comments

  1. Ben Wilson

    November 5, 2021 at 8:35 am

    We must all realize, all politicians are for-sale. All top leaders do what they are told by the billionaires who put them into power.
    I do believe this Virus was sent to the world by China. China did it to remove Trump from office. Now big Pharma has jumped on the Vax..solution. However big Pharma is going too far. They want to keep Vaxing us and all our children forever to keep the Trillion dollar gravy train going. We must end this craziness. We must end the careers of every politician who supported Vaxports.. We must fight all these CEO’s who are firing unvaxxed.. employees.

  2. Clash

    October 30, 2021 at 11:54 am

    Naomi, you have been thrust into the forefront of the battle carrying the banner of Freedom. Rebel news is looking for 20 cases to test these situations in court, and your cause sounds high profile enough to me to qualify! Please contact The Rebel! CNRL picked on you because they thought you were a weak WOMAN. They are wrong. Women may have the appearance of weakness but they are NOT! It is men who act tough, but are mostly physical cowards, where women are not. You need crowd funding if Rebel won’t take your case. Thank you Western Standard for making this known, Please follow up on this story!

  3. Longo

    October 30, 2021 at 5:04 am

    I wonder if Murray Edwards is a total dick?

  4. Deb

    October 29, 2021 at 8:58 pm

    Just found out the motive behind Trudeau’s mandating the vaccine for federal employees and encouraging Companies to do the same. Check this out and pay attention to the 19 min mark on the video. https://vimeo.com/639629778/797d356e9a?fbclid=IwAR3ocnBBeTDKyJ928zERhHmc26v53IVjli7awGNPkbmmt8pdylUVUplodFA

  5. John Lankers

    October 29, 2021 at 3:43 pm

    You can donate to https://www.rebelnews.com/tags/fight_vaccine_passports to help cover the legal fees, it can’t be cheap to go against an industry giant with dozens of lawyers on payroll.

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Energy

IEA recognizes Canadian oil industry as the environmental world leader

In 2018, oil and gas companies also invested $3.6 billion in environmental protection initiatives, recognized by the IEA as by far the largest environmental protection spend of any industry in the country.  

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Canada is doing great but should take measures to continue its reputation as a preferred oil and gas supplier on the global market, says the International Energy Agency.

IEA Executive Director Fatih Birol is a big advocate for net zero targets, but still recognizes the reliance on oil and gas that will persist into the future.

He said he prefers oil supply to come from “good partners” like Canada, he told a press conference.

“Canada has been a cornerstone of global energy markets, a reliable partner for years,” said Birol.

“We will still need oil and gas for years to come… I prefer oil is produced by countries … like Canada (that) want to reduce the emissions of oil and gas.” 

The same IEA report included recommendations for Canada to incentivise moves away from oil production, yet the director still recognizes Canada’s contribution to the global market.

World oil consumption returned to pre-pandemic levels and natural gas demand surpassed levels pre-COVID-19 last year, according to IEA data.

Yet Canada only supplies 6% of the current world market.

Consumption of both oil and gas is expected to continue rising even as more renewable energy sources come online. 

A Russian-caused natural gas crisis in Europe has many looking to Canada as a great alternative.

“The world needs reliable partners,” said Birol, of the European situation.  

Canada is the fourth-largest producer of oil and natural gas in the world and home to the third-largest oil reserves.

“This creates employment for Canadians and secure and reliable oil and gas for both domestic and global markets,” the IEA said.  

The IEA recommends that remaining competitive in global oil and gas markets requires further emission reductions, to ensure the sector remains a major driver of the Canadian economy beyond 2050.

Emission reduction has already been steadily implemented in Canada, analysts praised the oil and gas industry’s “strong track record” of reducing emissions intensity.

The oilsands by have decreased emissions by 32% since 1990 and further reductions of up to 27% are expected by 2030. 

Canadian oil and gas companies spend an average of $1 billion per year on clean energy technology, in addition to billions in environmental protection.  

In 2018, oil and gas companies also invested $3.6 billion in environmental protection initiatives, recognized by the IEA as the largest environmental protection spend of any industry in the country.  

“Canadian oil and natural gas producers are leveraging their improving environmental, social and governance performance and Canada’s stringent environmental regulations to build a global competitive advantage.”

Ewa Sudyk is a reporter with the Western Standard
esudyk@westernstandardonline.com

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Energy

Oil price jump prompts additional $6 billion in investments

Oilsand investments alone are expected to increase to $11.6 billion in 2022, a 33% jump.

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The largest oil and gas industry group in Canada says it’s expecting $32.8 billion in oil patch spending this year, a 22% jump from last year.

Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers (CAPP) says the increased investment will help capitalize on the surge in crude oil prices, the growth will amount to an additional $6 billion this year.

Oilsand investments alone are expected to increase to $11.6 billion in 2022, a 33% jump.

As of Friday, the price of West Texas intermediate crude oil today is $87.05.

Tim McMillan, president of the CAPP, said the seven-year high price of oil doesn’t mean bad news, as companies are recording record cash flows and investment remains well below what it was in the boom years.

For example, in 2014 the Canadian industry captured 10% of total global upstream natural gas and oil investment, and the oil patch received record investment at $81 billion.

“Today we’re at $32 billion, and we’re only capturing about 6% of global investment,” said McMillan.

“We’ve lost ground to other oil and gas producers, which I think is problematic for a lot of reasons … and it leaves billions of dollars of investment that is going somewhere else, and not to Canada.”

Alberta is expected to be the leader among provinces in overall oil and gas capital spending, with upstream investment expected to increase 24% to $24.5 billion in 2022.

Over 80% of the industry’s new capital spending this year will be focused in Alberta, representing an additional $4.8 billion of investment into the province compared with 2021, according to CAPP.

Investment increase is also excepted in British Colombia, Saskatchewan and offshore production.

This means major recovery for the industry, as 2020 was harsh with global demand crashing and oil prices collapsing.

Global investment is on the down turn, as potential investors are discouraged by Canada’s history of cancelled pipeline projects, regulatory hurdles and negative government policy signals.

McMillan explained many now see Canada as a “difficult place to invest.”

“Rapid demand growth for oil and natural gas globally and strengthening commodity prices mean there is opportunity for Canada’s industry for decades to come,” said McMillan.

“To ensure a true recovery takes hold in Canada, government at all levels along with the industry must work together to create an environment where the natural gas and oil industry can thrive and attract investment back to Canada.”

Ewa Sudyk is a reporter with the Western Standard
esudyk@westernstandardonline.com

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Energy

Energy report tells feds to incentivize moves away from oil

The IEA calls for the Canadian government to creating transparent changes to the oil and gas industry but incentivizing technology changes and creating emergency oil stocks.

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A new report says Canada should further invest in clean in electricity and that our country is already among the cleanest energy production in the world.

The International Energy Analysis (IEA) came out with a report outlining recommendations for Canada’s energy future, including balanced decarbonization across the country.

That means higher coordination between federal, provincial and territorial levels to set clear targets for energy efficiency in buildings, transport and industry sectors.

The IEA calls for the Canadian government to create transparent changes to the oil and gas industry but incentivizing technology changes and creating emergency oil stocks.

Canada’s electricity system is one of the cleanest globally according to the IEA report, as 80% of supply is from non-emitting sources such as hydropower and nuclear power.

“Canada’s wealth of clean electricity and its innovative spirit can help drive a secure and affordable transformation of its energy system and help realize its ambitious goals,” said IEA Executive Director Fatih Birol.

“Equally important, Canada’s efforts to reduce emissions — of both carbon dioxide and methane — from its oil and gas production can help ensure its continued place as a reliable supplier of energy to the world.”

The report follows Environmental Minister Steven Guildbeault’s announcement for Canada to be ready to eliminate fossil fuels in 18 months, with zero-emission cars and stricter methane regulations.

Conservative leader Erin O’Toole expressed concern on Twitter with the zero emission plans, calling attention to the need to invest in the oil sector rather than turn away from it.

Energy makes up over 10% of Canada’s GDP, being a major source of capital investment, export revenue and jobs, making the net-zero goals both a challenge and opportunity.

Since the last IEA review in 2015, Canada has made international and domestic commitments dedicated to transforming the energy sector, including a target to cut greenhouse gas emissions by 40‑45% by 2030.

Canada is also a part of the United Nations zero-emission 2050 target that involves over 130 countries worldwide.

Ewa Sudyk is a reporter with the Western Standard.
esudyk@westernstandardonline.com

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