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One in five boomers still have children at home

“Some are staying home because they have close relationship with their parents and the parents have encouraged them. They said, ‘Look you can go and have fun, you can travel around the world, that you can save on that rent you would be paying.’”

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national survey found one in five Canadian boomers have a child living at home, a number experts blame on high housing costs.

Last month, Leger surveyed 2,000 people born between 1947 and 1966 for Royal LePage. The online poll found 24% of Albertan boomers had children living at home, compared to just 14% in Atlantic Canada. For major cities, the percentages were 28 in Vancouver, 26 in Toronto, and 20 in Montreal.

In an interview with Western Standard, Wendell Cox, fellow with the Frontier Centre for Public Policy, said that “urban containment” in city planning has created artificially high prices for Canadian housing and some American cities have made the same poor choices.

“The whole Pacific Coast has done the same thing, and parts of the East Coast. For the most part, the Midwest and the South are in pretty good shape,” said Cox, who has been principal of Demographia in St. Louis, Missouri for 35 years.

“You had a good country before you started this stuff, there’s nothing wrong with it. And the middle class could afford housing everywhere, including Vancouver.”

Cox said immigration is not to blame for the high cost of housing.

“It doesn’t matter whether the people that extra come from China or the Northwest Territories. The fact is that you do not have enough land to develop because the planning system won’t let you develop. Prices were already out of control in the mid-90s, but things really exploded in the mid-2000s.”

Cox said before urban planners tried to limit urban sprawl, the median cost of housing was roughly three times median annual income all over the western world. Today in Vancouver, median housing is 13 times the cost of annual income, a ratio four times worse than it was there in 1969.

“In Regina, the housing affordability isn’t too bad. It’s about 3.3. That’s almost like it was historically and Saskatoon not bad,” Cox said.

“It hasn’t been as bad in Alberta. [Prior to] the oil bust…it was really pretty bad. But the house values have dropped substantially because the demand is dropped.”

High housing costs could have been avoided almost everywhere, Cox said.

“All you needed to do was stay out of the way and that’s the battle I’ve been fighting all this time.”

The survey found 65% of working boomers don’t consider their current region affordable and 42% might move elsewhere near or during retirement.

In Ottawa, Carleton University business professor Ian Lee told Western Standard the circumstances that keep grown-up children at home are varied.

“Some are doing it because they’re unemployed,” Lee said.

“Some are staying home because they have a close relationship with their parents and the parents have encouraged them. They said, ‘Look you can go and have fun, you can travel around the world, that you can save on that rent you would be paying.’”

James’ daughter lived with him from the ages of 26 to 30 to save money for a down payment on a home.

“I didn’t need the money. And so she lived here for four years absolutely rent-free, never paid a penny. And [my partner’s] daughter lived [in her mom’s house] for almost four years rent-free, not even utilities. And then she used that to buy a house.”

A quarter of boomers surveyed, and 34% in Vancouver, said they already had or would consider gifting or loaning money to a child to help them buy a home.

The survey found 54% of boomers have paid off their mortgage. For those pondering a move within the next five years, 63% would consider downsizing, and of those, 9% would do so to help their kids buy a home.

Twenty-one percent of Canadian boomers with kids at home don’t foresee them leaving, but fewer in Alberta and B.C. feel this way, at 8% and 12% respectively.

Lee Harding is a Saskatchewan-based correspondent for Western Standard.

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1 Comment

  1. Left Coast

    July 20, 2021 at 5:35 pm

    “Wendell Cox, fellow with the Frontier Centre for Public Policy, said that “urban containment” in city planning has created artificially high prices for Canadian housing and some American cities have made the same poor choices.” ? ? ?

    Choices? Anyone who has been paying attention for the last 20 years know that UN Agenda 21 has been pushing every City Council on the planet towards “Sustainable Development” aka Congestion & Stacking! Add in wealthy Hong Kongers in the last 20 years and you get million dollar+ entry level homes in Vancouver.

    In Richmond they have paved over some of the Richest Farmland in Canada for Warehousing & Subdivisions. Now you can barely drive around the Lower Mainland on their 1970s infrastructure of 2 & 4 lane highways. But no one has suggested it might be time to stop adding people, as homeless populations explode and crime accelerates every year.

    Thinking folks are now fleeing these disasters . . . created by our Politicians, who are some of the stupidest among us.

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Hundreds of Albertans protest in front of UCP MLA offices over COVID restrictions

So just a few hours after Kenney brought in the new restrictions on Wednesday, ready they were – and about a dozen MLA offices were picketed.

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He knew they couldn’t stop the government from bringing in even more COVID-19 restrictions, but Jordon Kosik wanted to be ready to show his displeasure.

Operating two Facebook groups, Holding MLAs Accountable and Closed for Fall, Kosik had his 17,000 members ready to protest just hours after Premier Jason Kenney brought in a fourth COVID-19 lockdown, which this time includes vaccination passports.

“A couple of weeks ago, we knew something was happening,” Kosik said in a Thursday interview with the Western Standard.

Protest in front of Nathan Cooper’s office. Photo courtesy Holding MLAs Accountable

“There was nothing we could do to stop it, but what we could do is get ready.”

So just a few hours after Kenney brought in the new restrictions on Wednesday, ready they were – and about a dozen MLA offices were picketed.

Some had a handful of people show up, while others had scores of people.

“This was on organic protest, people in their own ridings,” said Kosik.

And Kovik thinks this won’t be the end of restrictions, with more likely in a couple of weeks.

“To get ready for that we have to network, network, network,” Koik said.

Dave Naylor is the News Editor of the Western Standard
dnaylor@westernstandardonline.com
Twitter.com/nobby7694

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Vancouver gangster killed in daylight shooting

Several news sources said the homicide victim was well-known in Vancouver’s illicit drug trade.

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Vancouver cops are on the hunt for an armed killer after a gangster was slain Wednesday during a daylight shooting in Vancouver’s core area.

Amandeep Manj, 35, a known member of the United Nations gang, was shot about 3:30 p.m while sitting inside his car in the parking lot of the Fairmont Pacific Rim Hotel near Canada Place.

Soon after he bloodied body was discovered, paramedics raced to the lot, but Manj was pronounced dead at the scene.

Police said they’re convinced the shooting was a targeted hit.

Several news sources said the homicide victim was well-known in Vancouver’s illicit drug trade.

Manj’s brother, Jodh Manj, also died a violent death three years ago when he was killed while leaving a Mexico City gym.

Vancouver Police Const. Tania Visintin told the Vancouver Sun Manj is the city’s 13th homicide of 2021.

She told the paper officers responded to level three of the parkade near Cordova and Burrard streets “after a man was found unresponsive by a witness.” 

Police have made no arrests in the case, and ask anyone who may have information about the shooting to contact Vancouver police.

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COVID vaccines changing their names

The FDA approved new names in the US earlier this summer.

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What’s in a name? Plenty, apparently, when it comes to COVID-19 vaccines in Canada.

Health Canada announced Thursday it will accept the change in new brand names of the three most common vaccines Pfizer, Moderna and Oxford-AstraZeneca.

The Moderna vaccine will go by SpikeVax and the AstraZeneca vaccine will be named Vaxzevria.

The Pfizer vaccine will now be called Comirnaty, which the company said represents a combination of the terms COVID-19, mRNA, community, and immunity.

CBC said the vaccines didn’t go by their brand name initially, but now that new and more long-term data has been submitted and approved they will go by their permanent name.

Canada is still expected to receive vials labelled Pfizer-BioNTech for the next several months.

The FDA approved new names in the US earlier this summer.

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