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Federal citizenship book now in fifth year of editing

But don’t fret – the feds say the work is “being finalized.”

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Talking about a lengthy rewrite!

For the last five years, staff in the Immigration department have been rewriting a citizenship booklet, says Blacklock’s Reporter.

But don’t fret – the feds say the work is “being finalized.”

Staff said work continues on “historically accurate” accounts of indigenous history with other input from the gay community.

“The content of the new citizenship study guide is currently being finalized,” said Nancy Caron, spokeswoman for the department.

“A launch date for the new guide has not yet been determined.

“The department engaged with a wide range of stakeholders including indigenous peoples, minority populations, women, Francophones, the LGBTQ communities, persons with disabilities and academia. These extensive consultations will ensure the guide is historically accurate.”

The booklet Discover Canada: The Rights And Responsibilities Of Citizenship is published as a study guide for immigrants taking citizenship tests. The current version dates from 2012. Incomplete revisions have been underway since 2016.

“They are ongoing,” Immigration Minister Marco Mendicino told Senate June 10.

Mendicino said the changes would “reflect a more inclusive history of the diverse Aboriginal peoples of Canada” but made no mention of input from other communities.

“What changes do you expect?” asked Senator Tony Loffreda (Que.).

“We have reached out to many different groups and indigenous communities across the country as well as other advocates in an effort to better include indigenous history, cultures and values as part of the citizenship guide,” replied Mendicino.

“There is a need to have a restructuring of the way we educate not only new Canadians, but all of us when it comes to our past, our present and our future.”

The current guide acknowledges Indian Residential Schools “inflicted hardship on the students,” but adds: “In today’s Canada Aboriginal people enjoy renewed pride and confidence and have made significant achievements in agriculture, the environment, business and the arts.”

Discover Canada also celebrates the War of 1812, recounts the fur trade, praises John A. Macdonald as a “gifted politician and a colourful personality” and commemorates the invention of the snowmobile and Alexander Graham Bell’s telephone.

“Officials are revising the study guide to include these parts of our history that were left out for too long so that new Canadians know the story of indigenous peoples and their treaty rights as they begin their journey as informed new citizens,” said Mendicino.

Dave Naylor is the News Editor of the Western Standard
dnaylor@westernstandardonline.com
Twitter.com/nobby7694

Dave Naylor is the News Editor of the Western Standard and the Vice-President: News Division of Western Standard New Media Corp. He has served as the City Editor of the Calgary Sun and has covered Alberta news for nearly 40 years. dnaylor@westernstandardonline.com

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Hundreds of Albertans protest in front of UCP MLA offices over COVID restrictions

So just a few hours after Kenney brought in the new restrictions on Wednesday, ready they were – and about a dozen MLA offices were picketed.

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He knew they couldn’t stop the government from bringing in even more COVID-19 restrictions, but Jordon Kosik wanted to be ready to show his displeasure.

Operating two Facebook groups, Holding MLAs Accountable and Closed for Fall, Kosik had his 17,000 members ready to protest just hours after Premier Jason Kenney brought in a fourth COVID-19 lockdown, which this time includes vaccination passports.

“A couple of weeks ago, we knew something was happening,” Kosik said in a Thursday interview with the Western Standard.

Protest in front of Nathan Cooper’s office. Photo courtesy Holding MLAs Accountable

“There was nothing we could do to stop it, but what we could do is get ready.”

So just a few hours after Kenney brought in the new restrictions on Wednesday, ready they were – and about a dozen MLA offices were picketed.

Some had a handful of people show up, while others had scores of people.

“This was on organic protest, people in their own ridings,” said Kosik.

And Kovik thinks this won’t be the end of restrictions, with more likely in a couple of weeks.

“To get ready for that we have to network, network, network,” Koik said.

Dave Naylor is the News Editor of the Western Standard
dnaylor@westernstandardonline.com
Twitter.com/nobby7694

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Vancouver gangster killed in daylight shooting

Several news sources said the homicide victim was well-known in Vancouver’s illicit drug trade.

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Vancouver cops are on the hunt for an armed killer after a gangster was slain Wednesday during a daylight shooting in Vancouver’s core area.

Amandeep Manj, 35, a known member of the United Nations gang, was shot about 3:30 p.m while sitting inside his car in the parking lot of the Fairmont Pacific Rim Hotel near Canada Place.

Soon after he bloodied body was discovered, paramedics raced to the lot, but Manj was pronounced dead at the scene.

Police said they’re convinced the shooting was a targeted hit.

Several news sources said the homicide victim was well-known in Vancouver’s illicit drug trade.

Manj’s brother, Jodh Manj, also died a violent death three years ago when he was killed while leaving a Mexico City gym.

Vancouver Police Const. Tania Visintin told the Vancouver Sun Manj is the city’s 13th homicide of 2021.

She told the paper officers responded to level three of the parkade near Cordova and Burrard streets “after a man was found unresponsive by a witness.” 

Police have made no arrests in the case, and ask anyone who may have information about the shooting to contact Vancouver police.

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COVID vaccines changing their names

The FDA approved new names in the US earlier this summer.

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What’s in a name? Plenty, apparently, when it comes to COVID-19 vaccines in Canada.

Health Canada announced Thursday it will accept the change in new brand names of the three most common vaccines Pfizer, Moderna and Oxford-AstraZeneca.

The Moderna vaccine will go by SpikeVax and the AstraZeneca vaccine will be named Vaxzevria.

The Pfizer vaccine will now be called Comirnaty, which the company said represents a combination of the terms COVID-19, mRNA, community, and immunity.

CBC said the vaccines didn’t go by their brand name initially, but now that new and more long-term data has been submitted and approved they will go by their permanent name.

Canada is still expected to receive vials labelled Pfizer-BioNTech for the next several months.

The FDA approved new names in the US earlier this summer.

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