fbpx
Connect with us

News

Organizer says Stampede boycott picking up steam

Financial and image trepidation is also brewing around the Stampede, with major companies like TC Energy still promising to donate financially, but pulling all other forms of support for the Stampede.

mm

Published

on

Not everyone is optimistic about the promise of Stampede.

The Calgary Stampede is on track to happen again this year despite the COVID-19 pandemic but while many are thrilled to see the event come back, others are growing openly critical of the approaches taken by the government, sponsors, and Stampede itself.

Jake Eskesen recently created the Facebook group “Boycott Stampede 2021” and says it’s growing by the day.

“It’s basically to expose the hypocrisy. Of the Stampede being able to go ahead, while small businesses are closed, while all these restrictions are in place and people are suffering,” he said.

“A big event sponsored by big players like Bank of Montreal and Coca-Cola, who are also very onboard with these woke agendas and corporate welfare agendas, are able to get events to go ahead because they have the influence. They have the ear of the Premier (Jason Kenney), and ultimately the premier just wants to throw us a bread crumb to try to make people happy – but I think it’s blowing up in his face.”

He said part of the distaste for the event on both sides of the debate is the levels of restrictions that will be placed on it.

“Ironically there’s a lot of people who don’t like it on both sides of the fence… With our group for example, we take issue with the masking outside, what we’re to assume is going to be very strict guidelines around social distancing, and encouraging people to get ‘the jab’,” he said.

“Of course, there are people on the other side worried about this being a super spreader event because we’re allowing all these tourists to come in just for Stampede.”

Eskesen went on to criticize the hypocrisy of the lockdown rules especially regarding large outdoor events, comparing the vastly difference treatments of the Stampede with a recent AHS conjunction brought against an outdoor rodeo in Bowden.

Eskesen did express support towards Kenney’s call to the federal government to lift quarantine hotels and mandatory isolation periods for international travellers to attend the Stampede, but again pointed out the hypocrisy and potential danger of people travelling with possible variant viruses.

“Ultimately, I hope the Stampede can come back next year and we can move past all of this. It’s just this year, with the way things are right now, it doesn’t feel right. It’s not going to be the same Stampede that Calgarians are used to. It doesn’t feel right when there are so many other people out there who are suffering right now. I just feel like the Stampede is not the most important thing this year. Next year? Totally! I’d love to see it come back, I’d love to see it come back with no restrictions.”

Financial and image trepidation is also brewing around the Stampede, with major companies like TC Energy still promising to donate financially, but pulling all other forms of support for the Stampede.

“TC Energy has a long-standing relationship with the Calgary Stampede and while we will continue our financial support for certain Stampede events, we will not be participating in those events this year, from both a brand and a hosting perspective,” said spokeswoman Suzanne Wilton.

“This is a difficult decision for us but we believe it is the prudent one. Safety is our primary value and nothing is more important than the health, wellness, and safety of our people and the communities where we live and work.

“While we are as eager as everyone to return to normal, we must remain vigilant in our own protocols. Participating in Stampede events could create unnecessary health and safety risks for our people and business partners. We have communicated directly with our employees about our expectations with respect to acceptance of invitations to attend hosted business events. We have not provided direction on what employees do on their personal time.

Stampede spokeswoman Danielle Savoni said: “We are working directly with Alberta Health to bring safe Stampede experiences to our community in July and we look forward to celebrating with our many longstanding partners.”

The Stampede is scheduled to happen July 9 – 18.

Jackie Conroy is a Correspondent at the Western Standard
jconroy@westernstandardonline.com

Continue Reading
6 Comments

6 Comments

  1. Proudly_Free

    June 9, 2021 at 1:29 pm

    Why the hell is the Stampede going to be so restricted and stuck in 2020 when the provincial restrictions are on track to be lifted by the beginning of July? The Stampede should have the restrictions as the province which, if there are none in the province, means that there should be none on the Stampede grounds. Are we going to be free of these insane and inane “health measures” or aren’t we? If I can go to places like Heritage Park already and not have to wear a mask, at least when I’m outdoors, then why the hell will I need to wear one on the Stampede grounds? This is complete B.S. I would’ve expected these kinds of restrictions if they’d had the balls to go ahead with it last year, but NOW? REALLY?!

  2. Kelly Carter

    June 7, 2021 at 9:43 pm

    It is the same problem as hosting the NHL last fall while not allowing local sports to run. The problem with the stampede is it is a professional rodeo with about 80% of the competitors coming from the US, but our local rodeo’s are forbidden to run. It is the local rodeo’s that develop the athletes and the stock to the competition level required for the stampede. It is useless to have one without the local base. It is a political bone being tossed at the peasants so we can have a party with conditions. Meanwhile the chuck wagons have been canceled which pretty much guts that industry as few drivers will be able to survive 2 years with no income. I have been a volunteer with the Stamede for 15+ years, but I will not participate in something that is so restricted as to not really be either normal or a sign of open business but a forced compliance with pool noodling social distance and mandatory masking. No way! We are either open or we are not. If we are open enough for stampede then it is time to drop all restrictions, open up all businesses, allow all local rodeo and sports, and stop the insanity!

  3. Tony

    June 7, 2021 at 6:12 pm

    A good read is a June 4th article by Martin Kulldorff (one of the Great Barrington Declaration authors) called “Why I Spoke Out Against the Lockdowns”. It makes me very discouraged to think our leaders are as feckless and craven as they are demonstrating themselves to be. Stampede? Empty symbolism I think. Kinda late now to permit the serfs to have a party after a year of society-crushing policies imposed by so called experts.

  4. peter_s

    June 7, 2021 at 2:41 pm

    Having the Stampede will push the government to ease the restrictions, if they cancel it now, they’ll find it even easier to crack down again…

  5. Baron Not Baron

    June 7, 2021 at 12:29 pm

    Come on, they’ll have a mobile jab station there! You can get your bloodcloth while having fun!

  6. Josh

    June 7, 2021 at 11:14 am

    If the stampede have any association with the current government or Alberta Health Authorities. I hope nobody goes. we dont deal with nazi like governments or their supporters.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

News

Civil service mag promotes immunization passports

Any mandatory scheme would see Canadians required to carry proof of vaccination to eat at a restaurant, visit a shopping mall or go to a baseball game, said the magazine.

mm

Published

on

A magazine for Canadian public service managers says the country must introduce vaccine passports, says Blacklock’s Reporter.

“The immunity of the population is detrimental for the safe reopening of the economy and various jurisdictions across the world are exploring the idea of immunity certificates as an enabler,” said a commentary in Canadian Government Executive, a periodical published for federal public service managers.

“After a rigorous analysis of the issue of immunity certificates, this article concludes the necessity of immunity certificates in Canada as a key enabler for the safe reopening of the society and economy in a post-Covid world.”

Any mandatory scheme would see Canadians required to carry proof of vaccination to eat at a restaurant, visit a shopping mall or go to a baseball game, said the magazine.

“They can also be used to promote economic activities such as workplace safety, tourism etcetera,” said the periodical.

The magazine acknowledged Canadians were divided on the issue and numerous foreign jurisdictions have banned vaccine passports.

“It is important to note in the United States several states such as Florida, Texas, Arizona etcetera have either banned or prevented the mandatory use,” said the commentary.

Privacy Commissioner Daniel Therrien in a May 19 statement said vaccine passports breached the Privacy Act since they compelled users and non-users alike to disclose personal health information to access public facilities.

“There must be clear legal authority for introducing use of vaccine passports,” said Therrien, adding Parliament would require “a newly enacted public health order or law” before any mandatory scheme could be introduced.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau in a January 14 podcast called it a divisive issue.

“I think the indications that the vast majority of Canadians are looking to get vaccinated will get us to a good place without having to take more extreme measures that could have real divisive impacts on community and country,” said Trudeau.

“I think it’s an interesting idea but I think it is also fraught with challenges. We are certainly encouraging and motivating people to get vaccinated as quickly as possible. We always know there are people who won’t get vaccinated, and not necessarily through a personal or political choice.

“There are medical reasons. There are a broad range of reasons why someone might not get vaccinated. I’m worried about creating undesirable effects in our community.”

Federal research shows about 12% of Canadians would refuse a COVID-19 vaccine under any circumstances. A total of 26% said they did not trust the Public Health Agency, according to the Statistics Canada report.

Dave Naylor is the News Editor of the Western Standard
dnaylor@westernstandardonline.com
Twitter.com/nobby7694

Continue Reading

News

Canada Post to make bank on lending operations

The union said loans would be issued in a test project at post offices in Halifax and Bridgewater, N.S. and surrounding rural areas, as well as Calgary and Red Deer by year’s end.

mm

Published

on

“A roll of stamps and $30,000 please.”

That will soon be possible as, for the first time in 53 years, Albertans will be able to go to the post office for a loan.

Blacklock’s Reporter said Canada Post on Thursday confirmed outlets in Alberta and Nova Scotia will broker cash loans for the Toronto Dominion Bank.

“The market test goal is to offer the new financial service in over 249 Canada Post locations before the end of 2021,” the Canadian Union of Postal Workers said in a statement.

Post offices would offer Toronto Dominion loans of $1,000 to $30,000 at “competitive rates.”

Post offices currently sell money orders, gift cards and process electronic cash transfers but disbanded deposit-taking postal banks in 1968.

The union said loans would be issued in a test project at post offices in Halifax and Bridgewater, N.S. and surrounding rural areas, as well as Calgary and Red Deer by year’s end.

“CUPW continues to support the creation of an independent postal bank despite our current partnership with Toronto Dominion Bank,” said the union.

“Partnering with a financial institution does not put an end to the goal of an independent postal bank.”

Parliament in an 1867 Postal Act allowed post offices to hold cash deposits and offer cheque-cashing services. Postal banks at their peak in 1908 held the equivalent of a billion dollars on deposit.

A 2016 Department of Public Works survey found 39% of small business owners nationwide, and 44% on the Prairies, said they would use Canada Post banking services if offered.

The department paid $142,137 for the study by Ekos Research Associates Inc.

“I think Canada Post is very open to increased financial services, not necessarily ‘postal banking’,” Brenda McAuley, national president of the Canadian Postmasters and Assistants Association, said in an earlier interview.

“I think the word ‘banking’ scares a lot of people. The banks don’t think it is necessary.

“There are islands in British Columbia where people have to take a ferry to get to a bank. We will look at pilot projects. I’ve got quite a few places on my radar.”

Canada Post in its 2020 Annual Report said it was “reinventing our retail model” at 6,084 post offices nationwide, including “assessing new financial services and options” mainly in rural Canada.

“Our vast retail network of post offices and dealer outlets across the country provides convenient locations and services with many of them offering evening and weekend hours to meet the changing needs of Canadians,” wrote management.

Jessica McDonald, then-chair of the Canada Post board, in 2018 testimony at the Commons government operations committee said the Crown corporation was “very open-minded” on resuming postal bank services.

“Postal banking has been under a tremendous amount of discussion and continues to be,” said McDonald.

Dave Naylor is the News Editor of the Western Standard
dnaylor@westernstandardonline.com
Twitter.com/nobby7694

Continue Reading

News

Vancouver’s Stanley Park shut down at night because of fire threat

“The closure is being activated in an effort to reduce the fire risk to the park, which is extreme due to the current drought conditions and sustained heat events.”

mm

Published

on

The risk of fire is so extreme in Vancouver’s iconic Stanley Park, officials are to start closing it on a nightly basis.

“The Vancouver Board of Parks and Recreation will be temporarily closing all non-essential access to Stanley Park between the hours of 10 pm and 6 am beginning tonight,” said the board in a Friday statement.

“The closure is being activated in an effort to reduce the fire risk to the park, which is extreme due to the current drought conditions and sustained heat events.”

The board said park rangers will set up temporary overnight access control points at five locations.

“The current conditions in Stanley Park are extreme right now and given the size of the park, the risk of a fire breaking out overnight when fewer people may notice it or report it presents a significant threat to the wellbeing of the park, its trees, wildlife, and everyone who relies on the park and its ongoing health,” said Amit Gandha, Director of Park Operations.

“We have been in close contact with our partners at Vancouver Fire and Rescue Services as well as the Vancouver Police Department and they fully support this proactive measure to reduce the risk of a catastrophic fire in the park.”

Vehicles, bicycles, pedestrians, and anyone who does not require access to the park will be turned around at access control points. 

Anyone requiring entry into the park during the closure, including the #19 bus, emergency services, patrons, and staff of park businesses, will be permitted to enter through the control points. Individuals who remain in the park after the closure begins will have unrestricted access to leave the park through the control points, said the board.

The access control points will be positioned at the following locations:

  • Traffic circle off Georgia St
  • The corner of Barclay and Park Lane
  • The corner of Beach Ave and Park Lane
  • The south exit of the Stanley Park Causeway
  • The north exit of the Stanley Park Causeway

The Causeway will remain open but access to the seawall will be closed.

The temporary closure will be in effect seven days a week beginning Friday, July 30 and will extend indefinitely until the fire risk has been significantly reduced.

Stanley Park is Vancouver’s largest urban park, with more than 400 hectares of naturalized West Coast forest. The park has approximately half a million trees – mostly cedar, fir, and hemlock – some of which are hundreds of years old.

Hundreds of wildfires are currently burning across BC.

Dave Naylor is the News Editor of the Western Standard
dnaylor@westernstandardonline.com
Twitter.com/nobby7694

Continue Reading

Recent Posts

Recent Comments

Share

Petition: No Media Bailouts

We the undersigned call on the Canadian government to immediately cease all payouts to media companies.

170 signatures

No Media Bailouts

The fourth estate is critical to a functioning democracy in holding the government to account. An objective media can't maintain editorial integrity when it accepts money from a government we expect it to be critical of.

We the undersigned call on the Canadian government to immediately cease all payouts to media companies.

**your signature**



The Western Standard will never accept government bailout money. By becoming a Western Standard member, you are supporting government bailout-free and proudly western media that is on your side. With your support, we can give Westerners a voice that doesn\'t need taxpayers money.

Share this with your friends:

Trending

Copyright © Western Standard New Media Corp.