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Feds wanted to sue child killer Olson to get back $150,000 in blood money

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The federal government wanted to sue notorious child killer Clifford Olson to get back the $100,000 paid to him to reveals where his victims were buried, but they backed down for fear of political embarrassment, secret declassified records show.

Blacklock’s Reporter said then-Justice Minister Mark MacGuigan came up with the idea after it was learned the RCMP had paid Olson the cash.

“The Minister of Justice informed colleagues he was considering whether to bring a lawsuit to recover money paid by the federal government through the Royal Canadian Mounted Police to Clifford Olson in return for information which Olson had provided to the police,” said Cabinet Minutes

“Mr. MacGuigan stressed the decision was his alone as attorney general, but that he was interested in his colleagues’ views on the matter.”

Olson admitted the tortured and killed 11 children. 

The Supreme Court of Canada in 1985 dismissed a lawsuit by victims’ families to recover the $100,000 paid to a trust fund for Olson’s wife Joan.

News of the cash payment at the time prompted a public outcry following a botched police investigation. 

One of Olson’s lawyers later admitted the mass murderer had already confessed to his crimes before the payment was finalized.

Documents from a secret December 16, 1982 cabinet meeting said MacGuigan was upset by the payment. 

“He stressed it was recognized practice for police to pay informers who provided information on someone else, but before the Olson case there had been no precedent for paying murderers for evidence against themselves,” said Cabinet Minutes

“The main issue was whether justice was being brought into disrepute, and in this context it was important to consider whether the government had waited too long to take action.”

Cabinet agreed suing Olson to recover the money could result in politically embarrassing cross-examination of justice officials. 

“It was noted if the government’s case for recovery was to be based on the principle that the arrangement was contrary to public policy and morality, then the attorney general of British Columbia would have to testify,” said Minutes.

“The significance of this aspect should be considered carefully. It was suggested the Minister of Justice might discuss with his colleagues at a future date and before he decided whether or not to proceed, the specific arguments which he proposed to use.”

The cabinet did draft a law to stop a rumoured sale of Olson’s autobiography.

“The Solicitor General indicated the sale of the book was expected to yield approximately $400,000 to Olson and his two collaborators, one of whom was a Vancouver lawyer,” said Minutes.

“(Solicitor General Robert) Kaplan had the opportunity to read some of the material and there was a definite possibility the book may be judged as obscene,

“He was of the strong view it should not be allowed to be published in Canada, and if it was published in the United States it should not be permitted to be imported into Canada.

“Several ministers expressed support for the notion the government take action to ensure the book not be available for sale in Canada.”

Olson died in prison in 2011 at 71.

Dave Naylor is the News Editor of the Western Standard
dnaylor@westernstandardonline.com
Twitter.com/nobby7694


Dave Naylor is the News Editor of the Western Standard and the Vice-President: News Division of Western Standard New Media Corp. He has served as the City Editor of the Calgary Sun and has covered Alberta news for nearly 40 years. dnaylor@westernstandardonline.com

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BC top doc says declining vaccine protection over time means more boosters needed

Data from Israel — which has seen a steady increase in COVID-19 infections since June 2021, despite a high vaccination rate — showcases the transient nature of the jabs efficacy.

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Provincial Health Officer Dr. Bonnie Henry has a Christmas present for British Columbians, and no, it’s not thousands of health-care workers getting their livelihood back — but rather: more COVID shots.

Health authorities announced Tuesday that COVID-19 booster vaccines will soon be available to the general population, making BC the first province in Canada to do so.

The announcement comes less than one week after Prime Minister Justin Trudeau ensured nationwide booster shots for the coming years.

The province says “BC’s elderly and most at-risk” will be prioritized through the December holiday, but as of January 2022, boosters will be available for all British Columbians 12 and older.

Those registered in the Get Vaccinated System will receive a notification when it’s time for a booster jab, roughly 6-8 months after their previous dose.

“Our vaccines are highly effective. However, we are starting to see a gradual decline in protection over time. As a result, we are taking the proactive step of expanding boosters to everyone in our province,” said Henry.

Data from Israel — which has seen a steady increase in COVID-19 infections since June 2021, despite a high vaccination rate — showcases the transient nature of the vaccines efficacy.

Israel’s response, in an attempt to get cases down again, was to require booster shots after six months of one’s second dose in order to be considered “fully vaccinated.” Now officials in Israel are discussing the need for dose number four.

In BC, booster shots will not be included in the BC Vaccine Card for access to various settings — at least not yet — but the number of British Columbian’s lacking trust in the governments word grows steadily.

In May, 2021, Henry said “there is no way that we will recommend inequities be increased by the use of things like vaccine passports for services with public access here in British Columbia.”

Fast forward five months — vaccine passports are now enforced with no medical or religious exemptions, non-compliant businesses are being shut down, and workers are being removed from their jobs by the thousands for not getting the shot.

“I bet most politicians in Canada would admit that even they were surprised how malleable much of the public has proven to be,” writes political columnist, Spencer Fernando.

“No amount of hypocrisy or shifting narratives seems to stop a large number of Canadians from succumbing to fear-based appeals on the ‘need’ to restrict our rights and freedoms.”

Whether or not the fear is justified remains a point of vigorous dispute among scientists — with some focusing on the accuracy of BC’s testing methods when it comes to the data surrounding COVID deaths, hospitalizations, and positive cases as a whole.

“We don’t differentiate people that have died from COVID and have died with it,” said Dr. Steven Pelech, president and chief scientific officer at Kinexus Bioinformatics Corporation, and chair of the Scientific and Medical Advisory Committee at the Canadian Covid Care Alliance in an interview with the Western Standard.

Pelech argues the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests are poorly done in BC due to a high cycle threshold (CT), which as a result yields a high percentage of false positives, thus crediting an inflated number of deaths to COVID.

The PCR test is a tool often used in medical and biological research labs to detect the presence or absence of a gene, and while the test can detect the presence of a virus if you are infected, it can also detect fragments of the virus post infection.

The higher the CT, the more likely it is to pick up fragments of inactive viral DNA.

“They may very well have the remnants of the viruses genetic material that they breathe in, or they may have already recovered from COVID,” said Pelech.

In contrast to Pelech’s words, Medical Director of the BCCDC, Dr. Mel Krajden says a high CT is necessary when using the PCR tests, arguing that despite a potential for false positives, it is needed to detect early infection.

“People don’t understand that in early infection you will get at very high CT a very low viral load, and then as the infection progresses you get a high viral load and a low CT,” Krajden told the Western Standard.

The test, however, does not differentiate between what may be an early infection vs what may be genetic debris that poses no threat.

“High levels of amplification increase your chances of picking up garbage, that’s the problem,” said Pelech.

“If you’re around 38 cycles, maybe one out of 10 results at that level is accurate, whereas the rest can be false positives.”

Krajden said the CT varies across jurisdictions in BC, but confirmed it is “typically in the range of 35-42,” and sometimes mid-40’s.

The province does not take the probability of false positives into account when reporting its COVID data.

Krajden said that regardless of how the PCR test is administered, the point of focus should be from a population prevention perspective, specifically vaccination — hence the booster shots.

“The single most effective way of shutting down this pandemic is having a population that is immune,” said Krajden.

“The vaccines protect people from severe disease and death, and they do an excellent job at doing that.”

While the actual level of protection against COVID-19 one obtains upon getting vaccinated is debated, it is widely agreed upon that the shots efficacy wanes over time — and that the class of antibodies produced by the jab do not prevent propagation of the virus within the airways.

Krajden did say that a vaccinated individual can be asymptomatic and have a high viral load — further confirming that vaccinated people spread the virus, often unknowingly.

“After vaccination you have lots of IgG antibodies in your circulation and there is not much at the site where the virus comes in, so you can receive and transmit,” said Pelech.

“And as for being a ‘pandemic of the unvaccinated’… nonsense. Total nonsense.”

Reid Small is a BC correspondent for the Western Standard
rsmall@westernstandardonline.com
Twitter.com/reidsmall

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UCP MLA Aheer demands Kenney resign, praises sex scandal whistleblower

“I want to take a moment to applaud her (Ariella Kimmel) for her strength and to demand the resignation of the premier. This is a failure of leadership and a failure of being human.”

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Alberta UCP MLA Leela Aheer (Chestermere-Strathmore), has blasted Jason Kenney in a press conference and demanded the premier step down.

In a statement of claim, former chief of staff, Ariella Kimmel, detailed her time in a “poisoned work environment” and spoke of sexual harassment and the excess drinking she witnessed while working in the Legislature under Kenney’s government.

None of her allegations have been proven in court.

“I want to say how very sorry I am for Ariella who has a tremendous amount of courage and strength to be able to share her story,” said Aheer during a press conference Wednesday, following the explosive allegations Kimmel brought against the premier’s office.

“When somebody like her takes a step forward to say what happened to her and to come forward with the truth of this level, it makes us all take a pause about many things,” said Aheer.

“I want to take a moment to applaud her for her strength and to demand the resignation of the premier. This is a failure of leadership and a failure of being human.”

Aheer, former Minister of Culture, Multiculturalism, and the Status of Women, said Kimmel was her “lifeline to the premier’s office” calling her competent, strong and beautiful and said she “deserved to be treated with a completely different level of respect.”

“On behalf of anyone — and this is not a political issue, it’s not a particular party issue — this is an issue of people. It’s an issue of how we treat people who are coming forward with honesty and integrity about what has happened to them.”

Numerous tweets in response are calling on Aheer to “cross the floor” to join the NDP.

Richard Fantin tweeted: “A ‘strong woman’ or really strong person, would not continue to support a party that literally uses harassment as a matter of public relations policy. If you were ‘strong’ you wouldn’t need the UCP to back you and would have left long ago.”

“Cross the floor. Please,” tweeted former broadcaster Alicia Hope-Ross.

Aheer replied: “I’m sure people would be fine if I crossed the floor today. That would be completely understandable, but what does that do?

“I have a responsibility to stay put, make change, make it happen and call it out when it happens.”

When asked if she would launch a leadership bid to replace Kenney should he step down, Aheer said: “It would be completely self-indulgent to think about a leadership race at this time. It’s more important to make sure we get through COVID, but that doesn’t mean he (Kenney) has to be there.”

“Right now we can put an interim leader in, we have many many competent people in the ministry right now who can easily carry that forward until we get through COVID.” 

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UCP MLA claims Kenney knew about toxic workplace allegations

Kimmel’s lawsuit alleges sexual harassment and heavy drinking by ministers and staff in the premier’s office, which is responsible for overseeing ministries, CBC reported.

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A former UCP cabinet minister says Alberta Premier Jason Kenney knew about allegations of a toxic work environment in his government that included sexual harassment and heavy drinking.

“Ariella Kimmel is an incredible and courageous women (sic). Premier Kenney – you knew! Step down! ” tweeted Leela Aheer, UCP MLA for Chestermere-Strathmore.

Aheer was commenting on a lawsuit filed by Kimmel who claims she was fired after speaking out.

Kimmel’s lawsuit alleges sexual harassment and heavy drinking by ministers and staff in the premier’s office, which is responsible for overseeing ministries, CBC reported.

None of the allegations have been proven in court.

Kimmel has worked with the UCP government since May 2019, most recently as the chief of staff to the minister of jobs, economy and innovation from August 2020 until she was fired in February.

The statement of claim says Kimmel witnessed Agriculture and Forestry Minister Devin Dreeshen drinking with other ministers and staff and appeared “heavily intoxicated.”

Kimmel had an on-and-off relationship with Dreeshen prior to being appointed chief of staff in 2020,” the CBC report said.

She alleges after expressing her concern about how much Dreeshen had been drinking, she was confronted by the minister who “aggressively yelled at her to the point where she was in tears and a concerned bystander intervened.”

The statement also points to another incident two days later where another group was drinking in the minister of health’s office. Kimmel alleges the minister’s principal advisor, Ivan Bernardo, made sexually inappropriate comments to one of her female staff members.

Kimmel claims her report of the exchange to Chris Thresher, chief of staff in health, and the premier’s director of issues management, Matt Wolf, went unanswered for close to a month.

On November 17, Kimmel was asked to meet with Kenney’s principal secretary, Larry Kaumeyer where she shared about her interaction with Dreeshen and the sexual harassment by Bernardo.

Kimmel said she was told by Kaumeyer that Bernardo was “not going to be fired” but would be leaving his position at the end of the year anyway. Kimmel said her other concerns were not addressed. Kaumeyer is no longer working in the premier’s office.

Kenney’s chief of staff, Pam Livingston, sent a statement to the CBC.

“Sexual harassment is abhorrent and has no place in our workplace and society,” Livingston wrote.

“This government has zero-tolerance for harassment and takes all allegations of this nature very seriously. We are fortunate to have a highly skilled and diverse public service and we are committed to providing a safe and productive workplace for all of them.”

Kenney’s office says they cannot comment as it is a confidential human resource matter and added that Kimmel’s termination was unrelated to the allegations raised in her lawsuit.  

Kimmel was terminated on February 5 even though she has been told by Kaumeyer she would not be fired for bringing her concerns forward. She is seeking more than $399,000 for damages and the salary owed to her until her contract would have expired in May 2023.

Kimmel says she is unaware of any formal investigation launched by the premier’s office surrounding her complaint brought forward against Bernardo, who has since resigned in December 2020 to return to practicing law.

Damages Kimmel is claiming in the lawsuit include: “poisoned work environment,” fabricating and spreading rumours against her, failing to implement a robust sexual harassment policy, terminating her employment in reprisal, causing mental distress and reputational harm, and affecting her future employment opportunities.”

…more to come

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