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With Alberta’s future ‘at stake’, Kenney lays out economic recovery plan

Billions of dollars will be spent, immigration curtailed and business taxes cut immediately, Premier Jason Kenney announced.

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Saying Alberta’s future is “truly at stake”, Premier Jason Kenney laid out an Alberta economic recovery plan Monday that will see the spending of billions of extra dollars.

“We are a resilient people. And we are going to need that in the biggest economic challenge in our times,” Kenney told reporters Monday.

Billions of dollars will be spent, immigration curtailed and business taxes cut immediately, Kenney announced.

“This will create tens of thousands of jobs right now,” Kenney said.

The province will spend $10 billion on infrastructure to create, what they predict will be 50,000 jobs in building things like roads, schools, bridges and hospitals.

That’s an increase of 40 percent of what the UCP government had initially budgeted for.

Kenney announced the provincial business tax will be cut from 10 per cent to 8 percent, effective Wednesday, Canada Day.

He said that should create close to 55,000 jobs.

The province will also create a group called Investment Alberta, which will travel the world trying to bring investment back to the province.

Kenney said he had been spending a lot of time trying to woo a petro-chemical company to invest $10 billion in a plant near Edmonton.

“They’re not likely to make a decision til 2023 but the work we do now will lay the groundwork,” he said.

Kenney pointed out the province initially investment of $1.5 billion into the KXL pipeline project, which will create 7,400 jobs. He didn’t comment on what would happen if Joe Biden becomes president. The Democrat has said he would killed the pipeline.

Under the immigration program, Kenney said the province will reduce immigration by one-third. He said it wasn’t fair for Albertans who are unemployed.

“We are facing a real effective unemployment rate of up to of 25 per cent,” he said.

Kenney also promised money for cultural projects and the natural gas sector.

“This is a startling message to business” around the world that Alberta is the place to invest, said Kenney.

“This is still a work in progress but we must act now,” Kenney said.

“It’s a bold statement of confidence in the future of Alberta.

Kenney promised a “frank” fiscasl update later this year, adding if the province waited to act “the fiscal challenge would be insurmountable.”

Finance Minister Travis Toews note the province was doing better financially when the bottom fell out in March because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

He said because of it, the province has lost 330,000 jobs which “wiped out a decade of job growth.”

The province’s economic plan was drafted with the help of a panel of experts, including former prime minister Stephen Harper and Calgary economist Jack Mintz.

Opposition leader Rachel Notley said 50,000 jobs had been lost in Alberta even before the pandemic hit.

“There’s nothing new here. It shows they are out of ideas,” the NDP leader said adding it will do nothing to diversify the economy.

“The only thing that is bold is the rhetoric and its distance from the facts.”

The Canadian Taxpayers Federation said it was pleased to see the Alberta government accelerate the business tax cut, but is concerned that higher spending will mean a larger provincial debt tab for Albertans.

“Premier Jason Kenney’s economic recovery plan delivers tax relief that will help entrepreneurs get Alberta back on track, but there’s also a lot of spending so we’re concerned about the deficit,” said Franco Terrazzano, the CTF’s Alberta Director.

“Allowing Alberta’s job creators to keep more money to invest in their businesses and workers is the right way to fire up our economy and get more Albertans back to work.”

The CTF is concerned that the additional infrastructure and corporate welfare spending through the Alberta Enterprise Corporation, the Innovation Employment Grant and other subsidies will accelerate the government’s provincial debt tab and could mean higher taxes for Albertans in the future.

“Risking tax dollars so politicians and bureaucrats can play investment banker is the wrong way to grow the economy,” said Terrazzano.

“Instead of more corporate welfare, Kenney should lower income taxes so families and workers have more money to spend in local businesses.”

Dave Naylor is the News Editor of the Western Standard

dnaylor@westernstandardonline.com

TWITTER: Twitter.com/nobby7694

Dave Naylor is the News Editor of the Western Standard and the Vice-President: News Division of Western Standard New Media Corp. He has served as the City Editor of the Calgary Sun and has covered Alberta news for nearly 40 years. dnaylor@westernstandardonline.com

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Civil service mag promotes immunization passports

Any mandatory scheme would see Canadians required to carry proof of vaccination to eat at a restaurant, visit a shopping mall or go to a baseball game, said the magazine.

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A magazine for Canadian public service managers says the country must introduce vaccine passports, says Blacklock’s Reporter.

“The immunity of the population is detrimental for the safe reopening of the economy and various jurisdictions across the world are exploring the idea of immunity certificates as an enabler,” said a commentary in Canadian Government Executive, a periodical published for federal public service managers.

“After a rigorous analysis of the issue of immunity certificates, this article concludes the necessity of immunity certificates in Canada as a key enabler for the safe reopening of the society and economy in a post-Covid world.”

Any mandatory scheme would see Canadians required to carry proof of vaccination to eat at a restaurant, visit a shopping mall or go to a baseball game, said the magazine.

“They can also be used to promote economic activities such as workplace safety, tourism etcetera,” said the periodical.

The magazine acknowledged Canadians were divided on the issue and numerous foreign jurisdictions have banned vaccine passports.

“It is important to note in the United States several states such as Florida, Texas, Arizona etcetera have either banned or prevented the mandatory use,” said the commentary.

Privacy Commissioner Daniel Therrien in a May 19 statement said vaccine passports breached the Privacy Act since they compelled users and non-users alike to disclose personal health information to access public facilities.

“There must be clear legal authority for introducing use of vaccine passports,” said Therrien, adding Parliament would require “a newly enacted public health order or law” before any mandatory scheme could be introduced.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau in a January 14 podcast called it a divisive issue.

“I think the indications that the vast majority of Canadians are looking to get vaccinated will get us to a good place without having to take more extreme measures that could have real divisive impacts on community and country,” said Trudeau.

“I think it’s an interesting idea but I think it is also fraught with challenges. We are certainly encouraging and motivating people to get vaccinated as quickly as possible. We always know there are people who won’t get vaccinated, and not necessarily through a personal or political choice.

“There are medical reasons. There are a broad range of reasons why someone might not get vaccinated. I’m worried about creating undesirable effects in our community.”

Federal research shows about 12% of Canadians would refuse a COVID-19 vaccine under any circumstances. A total of 26% said they did not trust the Public Health Agency, according to the Statistics Canada report.

Dave Naylor is the News Editor of the Western Standard
dnaylor@westernstandardonline.com
Twitter.com/nobby7694

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Canada Post to make bank on lending operations

The union said loans would be issued in a test project at post offices in Halifax and Bridgewater, N.S. and surrounding rural areas, as well as Calgary and Red Deer by year’s end.

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“A roll of stamps and $30,000 please.”

That will soon be possible as, for the first time in 53 years, Albertans will be able to go to the post office for a loan.

Blacklock’s Reporter said Canada Post on Thursday confirmed outlets in Alberta and Nova Scotia will broker cash loans for the Toronto Dominion Bank.

“The market test goal is to offer the new financial service in over 249 Canada Post locations before the end of 2021,” the Canadian Union of Postal Workers said in a statement.

Post offices would offer Toronto Dominion loans of $1,000 to $30,000 at “competitive rates.”

Post offices currently sell money orders, gift cards and process electronic cash transfers but disbanded deposit-taking postal banks in 1968.

The union said loans would be issued in a test project at post offices in Halifax and Bridgewater, N.S. and surrounding rural areas, as well as Calgary and Red Deer by year’s end.

“CUPW continues to support the creation of an independent postal bank despite our current partnership with Toronto Dominion Bank,” said the union.

“Partnering with a financial institution does not put an end to the goal of an independent postal bank.”

Parliament in an 1867 Postal Act allowed post offices to hold cash deposits and offer cheque-cashing services. Postal banks at their peak in 1908 held the equivalent of a billion dollars on deposit.

A 2016 Department of Public Works survey found 39% of small business owners nationwide, and 44% on the Prairies, said they would use Canada Post banking services if offered.

The department paid $142,137 for the study by Ekos Research Associates Inc.

“I think Canada Post is very open to increased financial services, not necessarily ‘postal banking’,” Brenda McAuley, national president of the Canadian Postmasters and Assistants Association, said in an earlier interview.

“I think the word ‘banking’ scares a lot of people. The banks don’t think it is necessary.

“There are islands in British Columbia where people have to take a ferry to get to a bank. We will look at pilot projects. I’ve got quite a few places on my radar.”

Canada Post in its 2020 Annual Report said it was “reinventing our retail model” at 6,084 post offices nationwide, including “assessing new financial services and options” mainly in rural Canada.

“Our vast retail network of post offices and dealer outlets across the country provides convenient locations and services with many of them offering evening and weekend hours to meet the changing needs of Canadians,” wrote management.

Jessica McDonald, then-chair of the Canada Post board, in 2018 testimony at the Commons government operations committee said the Crown corporation was “very open-minded” on resuming postal bank services.

“Postal banking has been under a tremendous amount of discussion and continues to be,” said McDonald.

Dave Naylor is the News Editor of the Western Standard
dnaylor@westernstandardonline.com
Twitter.com/nobby7694

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Vancouver’s Stanley Park shut down at night because of fire threat

“The closure is being activated in an effort to reduce the fire risk to the park, which is extreme due to the current drought conditions and sustained heat events.”

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The risk of fire is so extreme in Vancouver’s iconic Stanley Park, officials are to start closing it on a nightly basis.

“The Vancouver Board of Parks and Recreation will be temporarily closing all non-essential access to Stanley Park between the hours of 10 pm and 6 am beginning tonight,” said the board in a Friday statement.

“The closure is being activated in an effort to reduce the fire risk to the park, which is extreme due to the current drought conditions and sustained heat events.”

The board said park rangers will set up temporary overnight access control points at five locations.

“The current conditions in Stanley Park are extreme right now and given the size of the park, the risk of a fire breaking out overnight when fewer people may notice it or report it presents a significant threat to the wellbeing of the park, its trees, wildlife, and everyone who relies on the park and its ongoing health,” said Amit Gandha, Director of Park Operations.

“We have been in close contact with our partners at Vancouver Fire and Rescue Services as well as the Vancouver Police Department and they fully support this proactive measure to reduce the risk of a catastrophic fire in the park.”

Vehicles, bicycles, pedestrians, and anyone who does not require access to the park will be turned around at access control points. 

Anyone requiring entry into the park during the closure, including the #19 bus, emergency services, patrons, and staff of park businesses, will be permitted to enter through the control points. Individuals who remain in the park after the closure begins will have unrestricted access to leave the park through the control points, said the board.

The access control points will be positioned at the following locations:

  • Traffic circle off Georgia St
  • The corner of Barclay and Park Lane
  • The corner of Beach Ave and Park Lane
  • The south exit of the Stanley Park Causeway
  • The north exit of the Stanley Park Causeway

The Causeway will remain open but access to the seawall will be closed.

The temporary closure will be in effect seven days a week beginning Friday, July 30 and will extend indefinitely until the fire risk has been significantly reduced.

Stanley Park is Vancouver’s largest urban park, with more than 400 hectares of naturalized West Coast forest. The park has approximately half a million trees – mostly cedar, fir, and hemlock – some of which are hundreds of years old.

Hundreds of wildfires are currently burning across BC.

Dave Naylor is the News Editor of the Western Standard
dnaylor@westernstandardonline.com
Twitter.com/nobby7694

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Petition: No Media Bailouts

We the undersigned call on the Canadian government to immediately cease all payouts to media companies.

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