fbpx
Connect with us

News

Ottawa demands Alberta adopt NDP Carbon Cap to get Teck approval

The emissions cap was recommended by the NDP government’s controversial Oil Sands Advisory Group (OSAG) in 2017.

mm

Published

on

Federal Environment Minister Jonathan Wilkinson made a formal request Wednesday that Alberta enforce the NDP’s 100-megatonne greenhouse gas emissions cap on Alberta’s oil industry.

The emissions cap was recommended by the NDP government’s controversial Oil Sands Advisory Group (OSAG) in 2017.

OSAG’s membership included anti-oilsands radical Tzeporah Berman, who counted her opposition even after the recommendations were adopted by the former government.


At the time, the oilsands industry was hovering around 70 million megatonnes of greenhouse gas emissions per year.

The Wednesday letter was the latest exchange between the province and Ottawa.

“For the feds to come in now and all of a sudden say the rules change, I will remind you that Minister Wilkinson provided equivalency for our large emitter program, which the Teck Frontier mine falls under,” Alberta Environment Minister Jason Nixon said in a Feb. 4 video.

“So the idea now that you change your mind, or change the rules, or ask for more is something that Albertans fundamentally reject.”

Nixon responded formally to Wilkinson with a letter on Feb. 12, accusing Wilkinson of “changing the goalposts”.

“During our discussions, at no time did you communicate to me that the 100 megaton(ne) cap on sector greenhouse gas emissions needed to be in regulation,” Nixon wrote.

“In fact, when I directly asked you whether you thought the cap needed to be formally brought into regulation, you told me it was fine as it was. Similar assurances were provided at the official’s level.”

Wilkinson replied on Wednesday saying the federal government had expected the cap to be brought in through the province’s legislative process.

“We continue to encourage Alberta to follow through and fully implement its legislation to limit emissions to 100 million tonnes (of greenhouse gas emissions) from the oilsands,” wrote Wilkinson.

The federal Minister’s letter also alludes to the fact the project was considered to be in the public interest by a joint review panel assigned to assess the project. That same review panel also determined that the project would likely have “significant adverse environmental effects”.

“It is our government’s strong view that all parts of Canada must work together to ensure our country continues to attract capital, create jobs, protect nature and cut pollution as the world transitions to lower carbon energy resources,” Wilkinson wrote.

“Alberta is the largest emitting jurisdiction in Canada, in both real and per capita terms.”

Wilkinson added that the two levels of government needed to “work together” in order to meet Canada’s goals under the Paris Agreement on climate change mitigation.

The federal decision on the Teck Frontier mine project is due by the end of February.

Deirdre is the Senior Reporter with Western Standard

dmaclean@westernstandardonline.com @Mitchell_AB on Twitter

News

Hundreds of Albertans protest in front of UCP MLA offices over COVID restrictions

So just a few hours after Kenney brought in the new restrictions on Wednesday, ready they were – and about a dozen MLA offices were picketed.

mm

Published

on

He knew they couldn’t stop the government from bringing in even more COVID-19 restrictions, but Jordon Kosik wanted to be ready to show his displeasure.

Operating two Facebook groups, Holding MLAs Accountable and Closed for Fall, Kosik had his 17,000 members ready to protest just hours after Premier Jason Kenney brought in a fourth COVID-19 lockdown, which this time includes vaccination passports.

“A couple of weeks ago, we knew something was happening,” Kosik said in a Thursday interview with the Western Standard.

Protest in front of Nathan Cooper’s office. Photo courtesy Holding MLAs Accountable

“There was nothing we could do to stop it, but what we could do is get ready.”

So just a few hours after Kenney brought in the new restrictions on Wednesday, ready they were – and about a dozen MLA offices were picketed.

Some had a handful of people show up, while others had scores of people.

“This was on organic protest, people in their own ridings,” said Kosik.

And Kovik thinks this won’t be the end of restrictions, with more likely in a couple of weeks.

“To get ready for that we have to network, network, network,” Koik said.

Dave Naylor is the News Editor of the Western Standard
dnaylor@westernstandardonline.com
Twitter.com/nobby7694

Continue Reading

News

Vancouver gangster killed in daylight shooting

Several news sources said the homicide victim was well-known in Vancouver’s illicit drug trade.

mm

Published

on

Vancouver cops are on the hunt for an armed killer after a gangster was slain Wednesday during a daylight shooting in Vancouver’s core area.

Amandeep Manj, 35, a known member of the United Nations gang, was shot about 3:30 p.m while sitting inside his car in the parking lot of the Fairmont Pacific Rim Hotel near Canada Place.

Soon after he bloodied body was discovered, paramedics raced to the lot, but Manj was pronounced dead at the scene.

Police said they’re convinced the shooting was a targeted hit.

Several news sources said the homicide victim was well-known in Vancouver’s illicit drug trade.

Manj’s brother, Jodh Manj, also died a violent death three years ago when he was killed while leaving a Mexico City gym.

Vancouver Police Const. Tania Visintin told the Vancouver Sun Manj is the city’s 13th homicide of 2021.

She told the paper officers responded to level three of the parkade near Cordova and Burrard streets “after a man was found unresponsive by a witness.” 

Police have made no arrests in the case, and ask anyone who may have information about the shooting to contact Vancouver police.

Continue Reading

News

COVID vaccines changing their names

The FDA approved new names in the US earlier this summer.

mm

Published

on

What’s in a name? Plenty, apparently, when it comes to COVID-19 vaccines in Canada.

Health Canada announced Thursday it will accept the change in new brand names of the three most common vaccines Pfizer, Moderna and Oxford-AstraZeneca.

The Moderna vaccine will go by SpikeVax and the AstraZeneca vaccine will be named Vaxzevria.

The Pfizer vaccine will now be called Comirnaty, which the company said represents a combination of the terms COVID-19, mRNA, community, and immunity.

CBC said the vaccines didn’t go by their brand name initially, but now that new and more long-term data has been submitted and approved they will go by their permanent name.

Canada is still expected to receive vials labelled Pfizer-BioNTech for the next several months.

The FDA approved new names in the US earlier this summer.

Continue Reading

Recent Posts

Recent Comments

Share

Petition: No Media Bailouts

We the undersigned call on the Canadian government to immediately cease all payouts to media companies.

339 signatures

No Media Bailouts

The fourth estate is critical to a functioning democracy in holding the government to account. An objective media can't maintain editorial integrity when it accepts money from a government we expect it to be critical of.

We the undersigned call on the Canadian government to immediately cease all payouts to media companies.

**your signature**



The Western Standard will never accept government bailout money. By becoming a Western Standard member, you are supporting government bailout-free and proudly western media that is on your side. With your support, we can give Westerners a voice that doesn\'t need taxpayers money.

Share this with your friends:

Trending

Copyright © Western Standard New Media Corp.